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Stage Talks

Challenging Conservation of Temples in Chambal Valley

  “Let’s Talk Trash”: Looking Back, Moving Forward

The Beauty of Chinese Opera

Frida Folk: Design as Narrative

 Performance of Daastangoi by Kafeel Jafri -  Afterlife of Memories: The IFA Archive

TalkAfterlife of Memories: The IFA Archive

The Weight of a Petal: Ars Botanica

Script to Screen

 Cinema and the city: Hyderabad Through the Decades

 Urban Wildlife

 The Sacred Yellow

 The Accidental RJ

Challenging Conservation of Temples in the Chambal Valley by K.K. Muhammed

25th January 2019

Time: 11.30 am – 12.20 pm

Bateshwar group of temples are located fifty kilometres from Gwalior deep in the Chambal Valley dominated by dreaded dacoits. Here, more than 200 temples of 9-11 centuries were lying in ruins. After protracted negotiations with the dacoits, K.K Muhammed, then the Chief of Archaeological Survey of India in MP, was able to piece together 80 of the 200 temples. But once the area was freed from the dacoits by the combined action of MP and UP police, it was taken over by the powerful mining mafia whose rampant mining became a threat to the conserved temples. In this Stage Talk, K.K. Muhammed, the man who spearheaded the temple reconstruction project, shares with you the agony and the ecstasy of fighting against the odds and reconstructing 80 temples from bits and pieces.

“Let’s Talk Trash”: Looking Back, Moving Forward by Shubhashree

25th January 2019

Time: 12.30 pm – 13.20 pm

The interactive session explores lessons we can learn from our earlier generations with a focus on how they were pretty effortlessly #zerowaste, even before it became a trending hashtag. The talk seeks to make you think about our consumption patterns and how the choices we make have a lasting impact on our planet. Ideas will be shared on simple, everyday things we can do to reduce our waste footprint and leaving the earth a little less messy for our future generations without breaking the bank.

The Beauty of Chinese Opera  by Ge Shuiping 
25th January 2019
Time: 14.00 pm – 14.50 pm
Details Awaited

Frida Folk: Design as Narrative by Ragini Siruguri

25th January 2019

Time: 15.00 pm – 15.50 pm

To ‘design’ a book is to essentially bring together text and images and create a meaningful experience through a play of image, form and function – an experience that puts forward new perspectives, questions, and thoughts. But how does this process happen? What exactly does a book designer do? Join us for an interactive session on design as storytelling and the role of the designer in the book-making process. We look at Frida Folk, a new title from Tara Books, and a visual recreation of Mexican artist Frida Kahlo’s life and art that features a staggering variety of objects, images, souvenirs and photographs, created by people around the world. Ragini Siruguri, the designer of the book, explains the various decisions and challenges – design, editorial, translation – that shaped this complex yet fascinating book.

Performance of Daastangoi by Kafeel Jafri – Afterlife of Memories: The IFA Archive 

26th January 2019

Time: 11.00 am – 11.30 am

Since 1995, India Foundation for the Arts (IFA), an independent, not-for-profit, grant-making organisation set up in 1993, has supported over 540 projects in research, practice and education in the arts across the country. This session will present the work of the foundation and the conception of the IFA Archive, its progress thus far, key milestones and expectations. The session will open with Daastan ek Talib ki (Story of a Seeker) a performance of Daastangoi by Kafeel Jafri. Daastangoi is a form of storytelling which was popular in the 13th century Arab and Persian worlds and later got adapted by Indian storytellers. This is a story of a young boy who sets out to find answers to his questions and ends up in a magical world where the lives, artistic practices and quests of his many ancestors mesmerise him. Do come and listen to find out what happens to him.

Talk – Afterlife of Memories: The IFA Archive

26th January 2019

Time: 11.30 am – 13.00 pm

Since 1995, India Foundation for the Arts (IFA), an independent, not-for-profit, grant-making organisation set up in 1993, has supported over 540 projects in research, practice and education in the arts across the country. This session will present the work of the foundation and the conception of the IFA Archive, its progress thus far, key milestones and expectations. The session will open with Daastan ek Talib ki (Story of a Seeker) a performance of Daastangoi by Kafeel Jafri. Daastangoi is a form of storytelling which was popular in the 13th century Arab and Persian worlds and later got adapted by Indian storytellers. This is a story of a young boy who sets out to find answers to his questions and ends up in a magical world where the lives, artistic practices and quests of his many ancestors mesmerise him. Do come and listen to find out what happens to him.

The Weight of a Petal: Ars Botanica
Henry Noltie, Lina Vincent, and Sita Reddy. Rizio Yohannan (Moderator)

26th January 2019

Time: 14.00 pm – 14.50 pm

For the first time in its 73-year history, Marg magazine – India’s oldest art journal – has published a special issue on botanical art. This visually rich volume pulls together multiple genres of botanical art to trace a broad historical arc from archives to contemporary works; from Mughal florilegia to Company School (kampani kalam) paintings. The special issue attempts to decolonize botanical art archives by highlighting and inserting the names of the hitherto anonymous Indian artists who created works for European and British Company officials. In this panel, Marg’s Rizio Yohannan speaks to the Guest Editor Sita Reddy, lead essayist Henry Noltie, and curator Lina Vincent on the wide-ranging contents of the issue. The session will also discuss botanical art’s history and politics as it impacts contemporary art pedagogy, inclusions and exclusions in current practice, and ecological awareness and environmental activism in the 21st century.

Script to Screen by Raj Malik

26th January 2019

Time: 15.00 pm – 15.50 pm

Filmmaking is an artform which involves almost all art faculties, and the process of recreating life through light and sound involves various intricate stages. We get an insight into the journey a film goes through from an idea, to a story which is told on the screen through artists from various disciplines. Is the movie business an honourable and stable career option? What are the challenges in the modern world for film makers? Is technology guided by art or vice versa? What is the relevance of creativity and commerce in the current scenario? Is there a shift in content consumption from the big screen to portable devices? Join us for an interactive session on film production and its various verticals, film distribution, marketing and much more. The session will reveal how a thought transforms into a movie, and its road map leading to the audience.

Cinema and the city: Hyderabad Through the Decades by Anant Maringanti

27th January 2019

Time: 10.30 am – 11.20 am

Although Hyderabad was a major centre for film distribution, it is only in the 1980s that the city actually began to see itself as a centre for film production. This talk narrates the story of cinema’s association with Hyderabad and traces the trajectories through which the city’s life is entwined with the rural economies of the region producing a tapestry in which cinema and the city reflect each other. The talk will draw on examples from Telugu and Hindi cinema to highlight tropes that endure as well as those that disappear. The goal of the talk is to identify promising new avenues for contemporary cinema.

Urban Wildlife by Karthikeyan

27th January 2019

Time: 11.30 am – 12.20 pm

The term ‘wildlife’ immediately brings to our minds dense, impenetrable jungles teeming with animals. However, wildlife refers not only to the large mammals but also to the larger world of trees, shrubs, other smaller plants, insects, reptiles, amphibians, birds and all else that is living. These may be the ones seen in a nearby park, in a garbage dump, in a small garden or even inside our homes. The presence of a water-body, of whatever size, often enhances the variety of organisms in the vicinity. With this understanding, let us explore our surroundings and spy some wildlife through an interesting dose of natural history and photographs. Observing all these life forms along with their interactions can be quite rewarding.

The Sacred Yellow  by Bina Rao

27th January 2019

Time: 14.00 pm – 14.50 pm

The Indus Valley Civilization, one of the oldest in the world, has been the treasure-house of ancient textile skills and knowledge of various techniques. The subcontinent has gone through many incursions—Arab, Turkish, and European. By the 19th century, India emerged as a multi-lingual, multi-religious, and multi-cultural country. “The Sacred Yellow” is a journey through this rainbow of Indian culture where the colour yellow is very symbolic. It is used in textiles and elsewhere in various religious and social ceremonies. India being home to the knowledge of “Natural Colourants”,​ it would be interesting to see how many natural sources can produce the yellow dye which is adopted in fashion and textiles today.

The Accidental RJ by Shezzi
 
27th January 2019
Time: 15.00 pm – 15.50 pm
 A conversation with the city’s equivalent of a strong cup of coffee. Shezzi lives her life, just like she does her show; firmly ensconced in her belief that ‘life is  for living, not for dwelling upon the past’. She’s here to share vignettes of her life and offer you some new perspective